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Delaware Bay

Datos del Sitio

País, Estado, Provincia/Región:

Los Estados Unidos, Delaware y New Jersey

Ubicación:

80 km de playa a largo de Bahía Delaware, entre el Cape May y Cape Henlopen

Latitude/Longitude:

39 10' N; 75 20' W

Categoría:

Hemisféria

Base de Designación:

Más de 500.000 aves playeras por año.

Superficie:

21.208 hectáreas

Designado:

1986

Propetario:

Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de los EE.UU.,
New Jersey Departamento de Protección del Medio Ambiente
Delaware Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Control Ambiental
Los municipios y las comunidades locales

Site Partners

Partners listed under "Additional Resources" tab

Población humano dentro 100 km:

224.018 personas

Contacto:

Amanda Dey
Endangered and Non-Game
Species Program 
Amanda.Dey@dep.state.nj.us
New Jersey Division of
Fish and Wildlife

 

Species Conservation and
Research Program
Delaware Division of
Fish and Wildlife
DNREC

Sobre Nosotros

En inglés al momento

In May of 1986, biologists, citizens, and political leaders came together to recognize Delaware Bay as the first WHSRN Site of Hemispheric Importance for migrating shorebirds. The site, over 52,000 acres and hosting more than 500,000 individuals annually, is vital for migrating shorebirds, especially the imperiled rufa subspecies of Red Knot.


DuPont Nature Center
Courtesy of Andrew Harper

Land included in reserve is coastal, from hightide line down. Mostly narrow, sandy beaches, some mud flats; area made up of shorefront and lowtide flats, including dunes, sandy beaches and sandy/muddy mouths of rivers, adjacent tidal salt marshes, and salt water impoundments. There are extensive freshwater and saltwater wetlands throughout the Delaware River and Bay estuary. 

The extensive wetlands in the Delaware River Estuary provide excellent resting habitat and nesting sites for many species of migratory waterfowl, bald eagles, ospreys, northern harrier, waders (including yellow and black crowned night herons) and migrating raptors. The area functions as a major staging area for 80 percent of the Atlantic flyway population of Snow Geese (up to 200,000). Several federal and state endangered and threatened species are supported including: Bald Eagle, Peregrine Falcon, Piping Plover, Pied-billed Grebe, Short-eared Owl, Delmarva Fox Squirrel, and Shortnose Sturgeon. Delaware Bay is also the site of the largest spawning concentration of horseshoe crabs along the Atlantic coast. 

The northbound migration of shorebirds coincides with horseshoe crab spawning in the bay. Shorebirds have been found to feed mostly on horseshoe crab eggs on the bay beaches, but some species, such as the Semipalmated Sandpiper, Dunlin, and Short-billed Dowitcher, rely more heavily on marsh habitats (Clark and Niles). All shorebirds move between the beaches and marshes for feeding, resting and roosting. NJ Division of Fish, Game and Wildlife, in conjunction with the Delaware Department of Fish and Wildlife - Nongame and Endangered Species Program, conducts annual surveys of shorebird abundance on beaches. Total birds counted on beaches in aerial surveys over the 6-week migration period range from 250,000 to over 600,000 (May through mid-June). Birds observed in tidal marsh habitats are estimated at 700,000, approximately two times that on bay beaches. (Clark and Niles). But species that associate more with marshes than beaches, are underestimated by aerial surveys (Gelvin-Innvaer, 1990, 1991).

Four species accounted for 99% of birds observed on Delaware Bay beaches: 

Semipalmated Sandpipers 30-70%

Ruddy Turnstones 20-35 %

Red Knots 15-20 %

Sanderling 4-6 %

Dunlin and Short-billed Dowitchers account for another 2-8 % (numbers fluctuate yearly). 

 

In the News

WHSRNews: Partners Launch “Celebrate Delaware Bay”

WHSRNews: B95 and YY1 Return to Restored Delaware Bay Beaches

WHSRNews: Red Knot Reunions

Economic Value of Delaware Estuary: $10 billion

Baltimore Sun on declining Red Knot population

Ecología y Conservación

En inglés al momento

Land Use: 

The coast of New Jersey and Delaware is heavily developed in parts (mostly private homes), with the Bay being less developed. There are large areas of state and federally-owned land. Many towns along the Bay are fishing villages inhabited more heavily in the summer. Human activities vary from walking, birding, fishing, and sunning, to periodic high human disturbance, including all terrain vehicles (on some beach es), commercial horseshoe crab harvesters, high concentrations of bird watchers, and dogs chasing birds. In the river and upper estuary, industrial land use includes chemical industries. The most important economic activities in the area are industry and fishing/ shell fisheries. The Delaware River and Bay are heavily used for oil transport; in fact the Bay is the largest port of transport on the East Coast of North America.

Protection:

On the Delaware side of the Bay, about 50% of the coastline, 20,670 hectares (51,054 acres) of wetlands, is in state and federal ownership and thus protected. In New Jersey, approximately 21,016 hectares (51,910 acres) of wetlands associated with the Bay are in state ownership, mostly as Fish and Wildlife Management Areas (FWMA). Federal areas under protection include: Cape May National Wildlife Refuge, NJ, and Bombay Hook and Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuges, Delaware. New Jersey Wildlife Management Areas include: Mad Horse Creek, Dix, Egg Island, Fortescue, Nantuxent, Heislerville, Dennis Creek, and Higbee Beach. Delaware Wildlife Management Areas include: Woodland Beach, Little Creek, Ted Harvey, Prime Hook and Cape Henlopen. The Nature Conservancy has launched a 3-yr, 15 million dollar fund-raising campaign to acquire 13,500 square miles along the Delaware River Basin and additional areas are protected by The Natural Lands Trust, NJ Natural Lands Trust, and the Cape May County Park Commission.

In Delaware, a comprehensive management plan for tidal wetlands (including recommendations for shorebird habitat) is being drafted. The Delaware General Assembly passed a bill in 1991 enabling regulation of the horseshoe crab take and mandated monitoring. Regulations were adopted instituting a permitting system, a season, and limiting methods of collection.

The point of Cape Henlopen, DE, is currently being managed for colonial water birds, primarily under the DE Piping Plover Management Plan. Large portions of the point are closed seasonally for plovers and many other shorebird species benefit.

Actions:

To learn more about ongoing community-based conservation actions visit Celebrate Delaware Bay. Celebrate Delaware Bay is a network of organizations, communities, and individuals throughout the Delaware Bay region, in New Jersey and Delaware that are working together to engage people in conservation projects.

Información Especial

To learn more about ongoing community-based conservation actions visit Celebrate Delaware Bay. Celebrate Delaware Bay is a network of organizations, communities, and individuals throughout the Delaware Bay region, in New Jersey and Delaware that are working together to engage people in conservation projects.

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¡Celebración del aniversario 25 de la Bahía Delaware sitio de RHRAP es muy exitóso!
El 9 de mayo de 2011, los socios por el hemisferio se reunieron en el pueblo de Bivalve, Port Norris, en el estado de Nueva Jersey (EE.UU.) celebrar la designación de la Bahía Delaware como un Sitio de Importancia Hemisférica de la RHRAP hace 25 años. El evento dió el emfasis a la importacia del sitio para las aves playeras migratorias, especialmente la especie en peligro Calidris canutus rufa. La Bahía Delaware también fue el primer sitio de la RHRAP y, por eso, el evento aniversario fue una oportunidad reconocer y agradecer a los visionarios y pioneros de esta red hemisférica de conservación de aves playeras.  ¡Muchísimas gracias a todos por el éxito enorme de este evento!

Recuerdos y noticias (en inglés) del evento aniversario 25 de la Bahía Delaware:

Carta especial de Charles Duncan, Director Ejecutivo, Oficina Ejecutivo de la RHRAP

Las Noticias de Cumberland County:
Celebramos la Bahía Delaware como un Sitio de Importancia Hemisférica en Nueva Jersey con Estimado Sr. Henry Paulson

La Prensa de Atlantic City:
Científicos usan redes para colectar y estudiar las aves playeras en Nueva Jersey

Las Noticias de Cumberland County News:
El aniversario de la Bahía Delaware Sitio de Importancia Hemisférica será celebrado en Nueva Jersey

 

Contacto

Amanda Dey
Endangered and Non-Game Species Program 
Amanda.Dey@dep.state.nj.us
New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife

Species Conservation and Research Program
Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife, DNREC
4876 Hay Point Landing Road
Smyrna, DE 19977

Delaware Bay WHSRN Partners

American Littoral Society

Bayshore Center at Bivalve

Citizens United to Protect the Maurice River and its Tributaries

Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey

Delaware Audubon Society

Delaware Center for the Inland Bays

Delaware Nature Society

Delmarva Ornithological Society

Delaware Riverkeeper Network

Delaware Museum of Natural History

Delaware Wild Lands

Friends of Cape May National Wildlife Refuge

Natural Lands Trust

New Jersey Audubon Society

New Jersey Audubon's Cape May Bird Observatory

New Jersey Audubon’s Nature Center of Cape May

New Jersey Conservation Foundation

Partnership for the Delaware Estuary

Rutgers, Departments of CBN and DENR

The Nature Conservancy, New Jersey Chapter

The Nature Conservancy, Delaware Chapter

Sierra Club, Delaware Chapter

The Wetlands Institute